An encouraging report from Clean Energy Canada says that oil and gas is not as important to our economy as headlines and politics make it appear to be:

But here’s the thing: Oil and gas have never really defined Canada’s economy. Crude oil, for example, accounted for just 2.6 per cent of Canada’s GDP as of 2017.

Vice put up a 30-minute video documenting what the youths have been doing behind the scenes to organize the worldwide climate strikes. The media pays a lot of attention to Greta Thunberg, but there are many inspiring young leaders in this movement.

Such a great call to climate action by the kids. I hope this gets reprinted by other news outlets:

To change everything, we need everyone. It is time for all of us to unleash mass resistance – we urge the adults to join us. On September 20th we call for a global general strike.

This piece by Jon Henley, a Brit reporting for The Guardian from the point of view of continental Europe, is one of the most interesting things I’ve read on Brexit:

Throughout the entire process, it appears from here, the Brits have been negotiating essentially with themselves, rather than with the EU27.

Seeing the election results in Australia (and other elections everywhere over the years) makes me wonder yet again how many people refrain to express their true vote. You often hear “but they’re not going to win so I’m going to vote for these other ones instead”.

Voting is a poll of what you really want. It’s your one chance to say what you think. Vote with your heart and your convictions.

Last night I moved my (micro)blog from micro.steveroy.ca to the more obvious blog.steveroy.ca, with a redirect from the old to the new. As always, let me know if anything appears to be amiss.

There was finally some movement in Canada this week to put pressure on our governments to be serious about climate action. I would love to see the climate crisis be the number one issue in our federal elections later this year. We have to tell Alberta that, sorry, it’s the end of oil. And we have to start talking about how we can transition our economy away from oil revenues.

In the light of Monday’s UN report on Earth biodiversity, I sent yet another email to my Member of Parliament to express my concerns and demand immediate drastic action in Canada. It’s all small things, but we need to tell them how concerned we are about the climate crisis and environmental collapse with whatever means we have.

Bill Mckibben in The New Yorker:

To answer [the climate crisis], at this point, means, in policy terms, a Second World War–scale mobilization to deploy renewable energy and a commitment to stop new exploration and development of fossil fuels. It means an explicit acknowledgment that their age is over

Here we go. Let’s see what this does:

MPs make history by passing Commons motion to declare ‘environment and climate change emergency’

How about it, Canada? Come on, what say you.